Little Touches

A Great Father-Daughter Dance Song: “Cinderella” by Steven Curtis Chapman

father-daughter dance

Are you looking for a unique father-daughter dance song? I heard Steven Curtis Chapman’s song, “Cinderella” on the radio the other day and absolutely loved the idea of using it for this special moment between a bride and her dad.

You can check out the video here, and here are the lyrics:

She spins and she sways
To whatever song plays
Without a care in the world
And I’m sitting here wearing
The weight of the world on my shoulders

It’s been a long day
And there’s still work to do
She’s pulling at me
Saying “Dad, I need you

There’s a ball at the castle
And I’ve been invited
And I need to practice my dancing
Oh, please, Daddy, please?”

So I will dance with Cinderella
While she is here in my arms
‘Cause I know something the prince never knew
Oh, I will dance with Cinderella
I don’t want to miss even one song
‘Cause all too soon the clock will strike midnight
And she’ll be gone…

She says he’s a nice guy and I’d be impressed
She wants to know if I approve of the dress
She says, “Dad, the prom is just one week away
And I need to practice my dancing
Oh, please, Daddy, please?”

So I will dance with Cinderella
While she is here in my arms
‘Cause I know something the prince never knew
Oh, I will dance with Cinderella
I don’t want to miss even one song
‘Cause all too soon the clock will strike midnight
And she’ll be gone

She will be gone

Well, she came home today with a ring on her hand
Just glowing and telling us all they had planned
She says, “Dad, the wedding’s still six months away
But I need to practice my dancing
Oh, please, Daddy, please?”

So I will dance with Cinderella
While she is here in my arms
‘Cause I know something the prince never knew
Oh, I will dance with Cinderella
I don’t want to miss even one song
‘Cause all too soon the clock will strike midnight
And she’ll be gone

Multi-Cultural Wedding Tips

ChuppahI had the pleasure of attending the Association of Bridal Consultants’ Central Florida East luncheon yesterday. The guest speaker was Yehudit Steinberg, the founder of the Jewish Interfaith Wedding Network. She specializes in creating ceremonies blending religions and cultures, incorporating both families’ traditions and beliefs.

Yehudit shared some tips that you may want to consider when planning an interfaith wedding.

1. Don’t rush. Long engagements aren’t a bad thing, especially when it comes to blending two cultures or religions. You’ll want to explore your families’ traditions, and decide as a couple which traditions to incorporate into your wedding, and your marriage.

2. Open communication. Encourage your families to be a part of your wedding preparations, especially in terms of the ceremony.

3. Address ceremony options first. Especially when you are considering marrying in a house of worship, you will want to secure the date with your officiants before planning any other aspects of the wedding.  In other words, don’t book your reception venue and then find out it’s Yom Kippur and no rabbi will marry you!

Be sure to visit the Jewish Interfaith Wedding Network website for more great information!

Valentine’s Day Ideas for Engaged and Newlywed Couples

bowling valentineValentine’s Day is next week! And as an engaged or newly married couple, you may not have the resources for a romantic getaway or extravagant dinner. Here are some ideas to make your day special!

1. Have a picnic lunch. If your offices are nearby, why not sneak away for a long lunch at a park? (This is great for us in sunny Florida, but this may not be an option for other parts of the country. How about an indoor picnic after work?)

2. Buy a case of wine. But no, don’t drink it all on Valentine’s Day! Label each bottle with an event you will share in the future – such as “the birth of our first child” or “our first fight as a married couple.” But don’t forget to label one “Valentine’s Day 2013!”

3. Cook a romantic dinner at home. But rather than one person doing all the work, one of you can cook the main course while the other does the appetizers and dessert. Check out Pinterest or AllRecipes.com for some menu ideas!

4. Personally deliver flowers. Anyone can call an 800-number and order flowers. But it’s much more special if you visit a local florist and buy some loose blooms. Then surprise your special someone at work with a personal delivery!

5. Go bowling. Ok, I know what you’re thinking. Bowling isn’t exactly the way most people want to spend Valentine’s. But guess who does? My sweetie. He bowls every Thursday night (actually Wednesdays and Thursdays), and since Valentine’s Day falls on a Thursday this year, guess where he’ll be? Not that I mind – I’m a fan of showing love and appreciation every day, not just one day a year! But guess what? I might just go hang out at the bowling alley next Thursday night. ♥

image source

What is a House Party?

wrist corsage

I know. You’re asking yourself, “Isn’t that what we had in college? Or for the Super Bowl?”

Well, the term “house party” actually applies to weddings too! With Florida being in “the South” but not always truly “Southern,” you may not have heard this term before. Your house party is usually made up of women that you want to honor, but may not be close enough to be bridesmaids. For example, a college roommate you aren’t that close to anymore, the groom’s sister, or your twelve cousins.

Here are some facts about house party girls:

  • They don’t stand at the alter during the ceremony, but they have seats of honor in front.
  • They may have “jobs” during the wedding: reader, guest book attendant, handing out programs, etc.
  • They don’t wear the same dresses as the bridesmaids; they choose their own dress, making it much more affordable! (Often they wear a Little Black Dress)
  • They take part in all the pre-wedding festivities, such as showers, bachelorette parties, and getting-ready photos.
  • The bride gives them a small gift, similar to the bridesmaids, to thank them for their help.
  • It’s a beautiful gesture to give them a corsage or hair flower to designate them as someone special on the wedding day.

What a great way to honor these special women without having 20 ladies in your bridal party! There can also be men in the house party – usually they are ushers at the ceremony, and will have similar seats of honor. They may were tuxedos, but often wear suits with boutonnieres.

(photo source)

Customizing Your Wedding With Monograms

Monograms sure have changed in the past few years! No longer are they just the traditional 3-letter merging of your names. In fact, many couples choose to “brand” their wedding using their full names and wedding date. Here are a few fun examples from our new collection, available for our full-service planning clients to use:

If you want to design your own monogram, remember that traditionally, the woman’s name comes first. Also, you may want to consider a style that you can use after the wedding.

Lastly, it’s still considered taboo to use the couples’ new surname on any printed materials until after the wedding – so if you will be using your “branding” on save-the-dates and invitations, use only your first initials or names. If you want to add your last name, leave it on the reception items only.